Wednesday, May 29, 2013

The Chaplain
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Chaplaincy: Manifesting God's Love

Recently I was granted the honor of addressing the graduating class of the Police and Fire Chaplains Academy at the Washington State Criminal Justice Center in Burien, WA. These twenty-nine chaplains from around the country had just completed a fifty-seven hour course, and are now beginning service to their perspective communities as police and fire chaplains. I completed this course ten years ago, and count this ministry as one of the highlights of my own priestly service.

I am grateful to God for all the friendships I've formed with other chaplains during these past ten years of service as a police and fire chaplain, and am privileged to count among my friends some of the finest people I have ever known. These are individuals who have dedicated their lives in compassionate service to others, touching lives during the most difficult of circumstances.

Chaplains minister to people whose lives have been turned upside down, with the loss of a child, the death of a spouse, the trauma of a fatal car accident, or a homicide. Chaplains serve as God's presence on murder scenes, or house fires. They hold children whose parents have been killed, and comfort the old woman whose husband of sixty years has died. They serve as pastors to people who have never had a pastor. They are clergy who lend support to a police officer or medic who is traumatized by an incident that would have sent most people running in the other direction.

I, like other chaplains, have broken down in tears while recounting situations that would traumatize the toughest of soldiers. I've seen fellow chaplains being strong for their officers, while enduring unimaginable pain themselves. I've suffered, like other chaplains, over the death of police officers and firefighters who were my friends.

At the heart of chaplaincy is the love of Jesus Christ, and a compassionate heart that is formed by a relationship with this very Christ. The chaplain runs towards a bad situation, offering his prayers and his heart to those in need. The chaplain is one who is the presence of God in the midst of tragedy, making manifest Christ in the midst of horrendous moments in the life of those whom he is called to serve. He sits in for God during those moments when no words can be found to comfort someone experiencing great loss. The chaplain sacrifices his own comfort zone so that Christ may be made manifest in the most broken of moments.

Chaplaincy is a unique calling, one that takes special training and deep commitment. It is not for the faint hearted, but a vocation that is as challenging as it is satisfying. The chaplain is an instrument of reconciliation between God and the first responder, their department, the community, and the families and individuals affected by tragic events.

With love in Christ,
Abbot Tryphon
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Wednesday May 29, 2013 / May 16, 2013
Mid-Pentecost or Prepolovenie. Tone three.
Fast. Fish Allowed

"Mozdok" and "Dubensk-Krasnogorodsk" (17th c.) Icons of the Most Holy Theotokos (movable holiday on the Prepolovenie – Mid-Pentecost).
Venerable Theodore the Sanctified (368), disciple of St. Pachomius the Great.
Translation of the relics (1545) of Venerable Ephraim, abbot of Perekom (1492).
St. Matthew, Hieromonk of Yaransk in Vyatka (1927).
Venerables Cassian (1537) and Laurence (1548), abbots of Komel (Vologda).
St. Alexander, archbishop of Jerusalem (3rd c.).
Martyrs Vitus, Modestus and Crescentia at Lucania (303).
Blessed child Musa of Rome (5th c.).
Monk-martyrs of the community of St. Sava the Sanctified (610).
St. George II, bishop of Mitylene (842).
Martyr Abdiesus, bishop, and companions in Persia (418).
St. Nicholas Mystikos, patriarch of Constantinople (930) (Greek).
New Martyr Nicholas of Metsovo, whose relics are at Meteora (1617) (Greek).
Martyrs Vitus, Modestus, and Crescentia at Lucania (303).
Venerable Brendan the Voyager, abbot of Clonfert (577) (Celtic & British).
Martyr Peter of Blachernae (Greek).
St. Euphemia near Neaorion (Greek).
Hieromartyr Theodore of Vrsac in Banat, Serbia (1595).
St. Carantoc of Carhampton.
Martyr Vukasin of Serbia (1941).
You can read the life of the saint in red, by clicking on the name.

THANKS to all of you who have been able to contribute towards the support of the monastery. These difficult times of economic hardship have impacted the monastery, and those of you who have been able to donate, have been our lifeline. May God bless you for your generosity, and kindness.
With love in Christ,  
Abbot Tryphon

Donations can be made directly to the monastery through PayPal, or you may send donations to:

All-Merciful Saviour Monastery
PO Box 2420
Vashon Island, WA 98070-2420 USA

The Scripture Readings

Acts 14:6-18

they became aware of it and fled to Lystra and Derbe, cities of Lycaonia, and to the surrounding region. And they were preaching the gospel there.

Idolatry at Lystra

And in Lystra a certain man without strength in his feet was sitting, a cripple from his mother’s womb, who had never walked. This man heard Paul speaking. Paul, observing him intently and seeing that he had faith to be healed, 10 said with a loud voice, “Stand up straight on your feet!” And he leaped and walked. 11 Now when the people saw what Paul had done, they raised their voices, saying in the Lycaonian language, “The gods have come down to us in the likeness of men!” 12 And Barnabas they called Zeus, and Paul, Hermes, because he was the chief speaker. 13 Then the priest of Zeus, whose temple was in front of their city, brought oxen and garlands to the gates, intending to sacrifice with the multitudes.
14 But when the apostles Barnabas and Paul heard this, they tore their clothes and ran in among the multitude, crying out 15 and saying, “Men, why are you doing these things? We also are men with the same nature as you, and preach to you that you should turn from these useless things to the living God, who made the heaven, the earth, the sea, and all things that are in them, 16 who in bygone generations allowed all nations to walk in their own ways. 17 Nevertheless He did not leave Himself without witness, in that He did good, gave us rain from heaven and fruitful seasons, filling our hearts with food and gladness.” 18 And with these sayings they could scarcely restrain the multitudes from sacrificing to them.

John 7:14-30

14 Now about the middle of the feast Jesus went up into the temple and taught. 15 And the Jews marveled, saying, “How does this Man know letters, having never studied?”
16 Jesus answered them and said, “My doctrine is not Mine, but His who sent Me. 17 If anyone wills to do His will, he shall know concerning the doctrine, whether it is from God or whether I speak on My own authority. 18 He who speaks from himself seeks his own glory; but He who seeks the glory of the One who sent Him is true, and no unrighteousness is in Him. 19 Did not Moses give you the law, yet none of you keeps the law? Why do you seek to kill Me?”
20 The people answered and said, “You have a demon. Who is seeking to kill You?”
21 Jesus answered and said to them, “I did one work, and you all marvel. 22 Moses therefore gave you circumcision (not that it is from Moses, but from the fathers), and you circumcise a man on the Sabbath. 23 If a man receives circumcision on the Sabbath, so that the law of Moses should not be broken, are you angry with Me because I made a man completely well on the Sabbath? 24 Do not judge according to appearance, but judge with righteous judgment.”

Could This Be the Christ?

25 Now some of them from Jerusalem said, “Is this not He whom they seek to kill? 26 But look! He speaks boldly, and they say nothing to Him. Do the rulers know indeed that this is truly the Christ? 27 However, we know where this Man is from; but when the Christ comes, no one knows where He is from.”
28 Then Jesus cried out, as He taught in the temple, saying, “You both know Me, and you know where I am from; and I have not come of Myself, but He who sent Me is true, whom you do not know. 29 But I know Him, for I am from Him, and He sent Me.”
30 Therefore they sought to take Him; but no one laid a hand on Him, because His hour had not yet come. 

I invite my readers to listen to my
Ancient Faith Radio podcasts.
JUNE 9 - Monasticism Today: A Journey to the Heart of God LIVE CALL IN ON ANCIENT FAITH RADIO
Guest: The V. Rev. Father Tryphon, a monk for almost thirty years, and co-founder and abbot of All-Merciful Saviour Monastery on Vashon Island, WA. Abbot Tryphon speaks with host Kevin Allen of Ancient Faith Radio about all aspects of (Orthodox Christian) monasticism in the 21 century (and perhaps some of his interesting personal journey story).

It will be a live stream -- as AFR is recording it -- but will also be available later as a download on AFR and the AFT archives.

It will stream live via Internet on Ancient Faith Radio TALK is 5 PM - 6:30 PM Pacific (US); 6 PM Mountain; 7 PM Central; and, 8 PM (- 9:30 PM) Eastern.

For foreign countries, please refer to the US standard times and adjust accordingly.

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